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Research and Evaluation

As Liliʻuokalani Trust (LT) focuses on ending the cycle of poverty and promotes thriving for Native Hawaiian kamaliʻi (children), our Research and Evaluation department is generating reports to highlight some of the social conditions of our kamaliʻi and ways to improve them.  


| Evaluation with Aloha: A Framework for Working in Native Hawaiian Contexts |

The Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment-Hawaiʻi (CREA-HI) hui began meeting in 2014 as a group of evaluation professionals and other community practitioners seeking to uplift indigenous paradigms in evaluation.

The Aloha Framework is humbly and respectfully offered to evaluators, those who commission evaluation services, and those who participate in or are otherwise stakeholders in evaluations conducted in Native Hawaiian contexts. It is our hope that evaluators will use this document to reflect on their practice and be inspired to share their successes and challenges, that evalua­tion funders will use this document to guide the solicitation and selection of evaluators, and that the communities and organiza­tions who are impacted by and who are (ideally) participants in evaluations will use this document to ensure their voices are fully and fairly represented. (Note, communities is used in this docu­ment as comprising regions or locales or social or affinity groups.)

| State of Play Hawaiʻi |

In a state whose greatest strength is its culture and a desire of its kamali'i to reconnect with tradition and language, State of Play Hawai'i shows kids are moving away from local leagues at young ages to play sports year-round for teams farther from home. Preliminary research suggests that youth sports parents in Hawai'i spend $732 per child annually in one sport, higher than the national average. Meanwhile, kids said the main reason they participate in sports is to play with friends; winning ranked 11th.

The report, commissioned by Lili'uokalani Trust (LT), followed an eight-month analysis of how well adults in the state are serving youth sports in each of Hawai'i's four counties with a focus on Native Hawaiian youth. LT will assemble a task force to analyze the report's findings and recommendations.

 

| Kūkulu Kumuhana |

Our first report, the proceedings of the 2017 Kūkulu Kumuhana: Creating Radical and New Knowledge to Improve Native Hawaiian Wellbeing, was co-sponsored by Kamehameha Schools, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the Consuelo Foundation, Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Hawaiʻi, the Department of Native Hawaiian Health-John A. Burns School of Medicine, and the Kualoa-Heʻeia Ecumenical Youth (KEY) Project.

Coming soon to our website are LT's first education brief, Disparate Impact of Exclusionary Discipline on Native Hawaiian and other (Pacific Islander) Students, and the Vulnerablilities Profiles of our Hawaiian youth.

 

Kūkulu Kumuhana: 2018 Year in Review

Kūkulu Kumuhana: Creating Radical and New Knowledge to Improve Native Hawaiian Wellbeing

 

 

| Community Profile Data |

This second report is a set of statistical Community Profiles of the geographic areas LT serves. The statistical data are organized under the domains or “petals” of LT's wellbeing framework, the Pua Liliʻu.  

               Community Profile Hilo

               Community Profile Honolulu

               Community Profile Kauaʻi

               Community Profile Koʻolau Poko

               Community Profile Koʻolauloa

               Community Profile Kona

               Community Profile Lānaʻi

               Community Profile Maui

               Community Profile Molokaʻi

               Community Profile Waiʻanae

               State of Hawaiʻi Profile 

               Data Reflection Questions

               Resources for Community Profile Data